Class Guide - Teach at Macaulay Splash

Guide to Creating Classes

Quick Guide:

  • Fill out the general interest form.
  • Think of a class idea and use this guide below to help you.
  • Complete a class outline.
  • Submit your class title, description, and outline by February 11th (extended deadline).

Quick Resources:

Teacher Guide (printable version of this guide and expectations)

Check out an extensive list of classes from a past Splash:


Choosing a Topic

Classes can be about absolutely anything. The goal of Splash classes is to go beyond the boundaries of what students are taught in their middle/high schools whether that be by teaching a subject that is not commonly taught or by asking unique questions about a subject that aren’t often addressed in the classroom. Class ideas should come out of what you are passionate about and have some experience in. What makes you excited? What do you nerd out about?


Class Examples:

Food and Media

This class will cover topics such as food photography for social media posts such as Instagram, Snapchat, and food blogs, as well as what makes a food “trendy”. Student will get to prepare (and eat!) their own highly “Instagrammable” foods (Freakshakes, avocado toasts, etc.), practice their newly learned “photography” skills on various types of prepared food, and critique each other’s work and photos.

The Math Behind Poker

How do you make the best decisions while playing poker? Well, thinking of it from a mathematical perspective can help. In this class, we’ll consider how 1) you can use the odds of winning when on a drawing hand to decide whether or not to fold, call, or raise; 2) the number of other players remaining in the hand can affect the relative value of starting hands; 3) your stack size can affect the way you play; 4) tournaments and cash games are different and 5) bluffing (sometimes, but not always) makes sense.

Your Computer is Smarter Than You

How can a computer assign a caption to a picture (e.g. http://tinyurl.com/jzus4h7)? How could a computer tell you what disease someone has based on the symptoms (like WebMD)? We’ll give you a broad overview of lots of machine learning algorithms popular today. How can a computer assign a caption to a picture (e.g. http://tinyurl.com/jzus4h7)? How could a computer tell you what disease someone has based on the symptoms (like WebMD)? We’ll give you a broad overview of lots of machine learning algorithms popular today.

A Very Brief History of Western Philosophy

What is truth, and how has our understanding of truth developed over time? What has it meant to “live the examined life?” In this class we will explore important time periods and figures in Western philosophy: Socrates, Descartes, Sartre, just to name a few. We will examine and analyze the questions they have pondered throughout the ages, and how their search for a greater understanding of the universe has evolved to the questions we ask today.

You can find an extensive list of classes here.


Class Considerations

Just like the classes you take in college, classes have specific objectives and audiences. They are carefully planned and designed. At this stage, you are not required to submit a syllabus but in the future, you will be asked to fill out a planning guide and work with our Education & Workshops team to refine your class so that it’s in tip-top shape for the big day.

However, some things that you should consider are:

Field What’s the broader discipline that your class falls under? Is your class interdisciplinary? If so, what fields of study does it drawn upon?

Objective What do you want your students to know or experience at the end of your class?

Audience Not all classes are fit for everyone. Does your class require prior knowledge in the topic area? Is there a limit to how many students can participate in your class at once?

Class Style Is your class going to be lecture style? Interactive? Project-based?



Last modified by kcornelis on Feb. 02, 2018 at 06:09 p.m.